Life is hard.

Most of you know about my horse Zbar Lynx to Cash aka Lynx. He has been my champion for over 10 years. I raised him. I’m the only one that has ever run him on barrels. On the flip side, he has been giving lessons to my kiddos.

This horse taught me what trust means. How to truly trust in training and how to let it go to enjoy the ride. Never have I ever felt what I felt when running Lynx. I always knew he was going to turn that first barrel no matter how hard he came running! The feeling of flying through the air and just knowing I would enjoy the ride was everything. He was my partner. He always stayed under me in every single situation. It was the best feeling in the world to run him (horse wise) and I am really going to miss it.

Today we went to the vet. He has been “off” on his front right for some time now. Last week he also injured his right hind. We went in around thanksgiving and didn’t find anything new with front right. But the right hind had me worried. Right off the bat, my vet started blocking his front end. One foot at a time. He said whatever went on with the hind leg is fine. But his front had him pulling out the ultrasound. Come to find out, he has a lesion on his right front deep digital flexor tendon. Not a small one either. At age 15, he is now retired. Not much can be done. It’s a large lesion. He also has fluid on the front left in the same area. I have been praying for an answer. A solution. What to do to help him. This was not the answer I expected. He is retired to the point that he can’t give lessons. He can give pony rides. He might be ok for a nice quiet trail ride. But not right now. I think my heart broke in half with this news.

Being told that your heart horse will no longer get to run, lope, workout (he is that crazy workout guy) or really do anything at all is simply devastating. I don’t know how to tell him that he can’t go on the trailer anymore. That I pulled his shoes so he can enjoy the pasture life. I don’t think he is going to take it well at all. My rockstar is now retired. I can get a second opinion. I can put thousands of dollars into a 2% chance of helping this but the outcome is slim to none. I will let him live his happy life knowing that his past was AMAZING.

Honestly, I don’t know what to do with myself now. Do I really want to barrel race on another horse? Not really, no. I can’t imagine running anyone but Lynx. 10 plus years is a long time. Whiskey will be broke to ride soon. Do I want to run him on barrels? Honestly, I don’t know. I think I might try sorting. This situation is simply soul crushing for me. So I’m sorry if I come off a little coarse for a bit. I don’t mean it. My heart is standing in a stall asking me why we can’t go for a gallop across the field right now. I’m going to cry. I’m going to be sad. I’m going to go through all the stages of grief. God has his plans. I just wish I knew the outcome.

Saturday is the beginning of a new journey!

I have this thing about horses. Not many realize that I actually knew Lynx and Goose at birth. I knew their dam at birth. I helped my dad to purchase their grand dam back in 1999? Maybe 1998? Also, I bought Gabe as a yearling. These have been the dominant horses of my last 15 years. It’s been a journey with each of them. I haven’t purchased any broke horses, except Splash, in a long time! So here I go again!

Remember playing the name game for a cutting bred foal back in 2019? He was born in May of 2019. Barn name is Whiskey! Solid bay colt out of a buckskin mare and I do believe the stallion was a dun. Well, it’s time to go pick the booger butt up from his spoiled life at the Ranch and give him a J-O-B!

Pedigree

I’m not sure how tall he is now but no doubt he is stout. He has been loaded a few times in the trailer. He does good for the farrier. He has been saddled a few times. But he is not broke. He needs some manners and something to do other than be a pasture pet! I prayed on this and have over thought it between prayers… then I just had a good feeling that all will work out. He many not be some 1D or even 5D barrel horse. But, by God’s Grace and Glory, he will have a job! Who knows? Maybe I will get back into sorting? I used to love to do team penning on my barrel horses!!! Sorting might be a fun adventure!

Whiskey in 2020

This colt is out of a mare that my husband bought for me when we bought our first house! She is 21 now. At the time, she was a fat an sassy buttermilk buckskin with a frosted mane and tail. She was very pregnant with a local stud’s progeny. Her first foal was a pretty little filly that looked just like her! We did breed her again and got a heck of a colt that was full of himself! A sorrel colt. Cooter’s Runnin Shine. See, the mare is registered MJG Scottish Scoot. Barn name is Chevis. First filly was Hot Scotch Tottie. See the theme?

My thought is to blog my journey with this colt as much as possible! He has a brain. He has a great build and is pretty correct in his confirmation. Bred to preform either in arena work or cattle. Who knows? It will be one day at a time at my place! So follow along with us as we prepare Whiskey for life!

Reasons

When it comes to horses, in any discipline, we all have our way of doing things. A lot of the things we do are because someone else told us to do it THAT way. Think about it. Who up and decided that we should always lead, saddle and mount from the left side of the horse? If I had to guess, it was a right handed person! If you are leading on the left side of the horse, your right arm is your strongest, so that would make it easier to control the horse. Makes sense. Saddling from the right side is a different perspective . Reflect back to when men carried swords. They carried them on the left side to make them easy to draw from the scabbard once mounted. Can you imagine swinging your leg over a horse that had a steel sword strapped to it? Makes sense for back in the day!

So now I wonder why we mount from the left in modern day. It’s the side that the latigo and girth meet up to tighten a western saddle. English saddles, it’s the side the elastic straps are located (on my English saddle) so I assume it’s easier to re-adjust when you put your foot in the stirrup to get one and feel that your saddle is loose. Makes sense!

With all this being said, why do we do it every single time? Horses are used to routine. Their brains prefer this, that and there. I know mine do! However, I have been in many situations where I had to mount or dismount on the right side. I’m so glad that we had already worked on that move because I was in a bad bind! I highly recommend that you practice mounting, saddling and leading your horse from both sides. One day you will be in a situation that you have no other choice. We do things out of habit and perhaps there was a real strong reason for it, but I don’t often carry my sword anymore!